The AfriSam-SAIA Award for Sustainable Architecture winners

Koop Design’s Dalton Private Reserve in the KwaZulu-Natal Midlands has won the top award at the AfriSam-SAIA Awards for Sustainable Architecture.

The award was made at a ceremony at Turbine Hall in Newtown as part of AZA 2010, South Africa’s first architecture mega-event which has brought together leading-edge thinkers and multi-disciplinary practitioners from around the globe.

Commendations went to Savage & Dodd Architects for Hillbrow’s Ekhaya Project; Nsika Architecture and Design for the renovations at the Lifestyle Garden Centre in Gauteng; ARG Design for the Lynedoch Community Centre on the Spier Wine Estate in the Cape and Metropolis for a family residence in Bishops Court in Cape Town.

Koop Design’s Dalton Compound is an integrated component of its environment, a

3 000-hectare reserve. It is the operational centre of the re­serve with buildings that are flexible to various utilitarian needs yet offer exclusivity to guests staying at the compound’s luxury accommodation. The project removed alien vegetation and recycled it for use. A vegetable garden was created for staff and the local community was trained and employed in the construction of the compound.

Richard Stretton started Koop Design in 1999. Koop’s design ethos is to produce buildings and products that are environmentally sensitive and energy efficient.

The South African Institute of Architects! (SAIA) partnered with AfriSam (South Africa) (Pty) Ltd for this, the first AfriSam-SAIA Awards for Sustainable Architecture, a biennial initiative aimed at recognising outstanding achievement in sustainable architecture.

Says Al Stratford, President of SAIA: “The future for architects will be defined by accelerating urbanisation and climate change, precipitating economic and cultural adjustment, demanding an integrated sustainable design and practice response.”

The AfriSam-SAIA Award recipient and commendations went to:

WINNER

The Dalton Private Reserve

Koop Design

The Dalton Compound is an integrated component of its environment, a 3 000-hectare reserve in rural KZN. It is the operational centre of the reserve with buildings that are flexible to various utilitarian needs yet offer exclusivity to guests staying at the compound’s luxury accommodation. The project removed alien vegetation, recycling it for use. It created a vegetable garden for staff and employed and trained local villagers for its construction.

COMMENDATIONS

The eKhaya Neighbourhood Improvement Programme

Savage + Dodd Architects            

In the Hillbrow community along Pietersen Street, the eKhaya Project took decayed, mismanaged buildings and recycled them to create healthy, economically and socially sustainable ones. eKhaya was the first of its kind to envisage forming a residential neighbourhood community. It developed through discussions concerning common interests between property owners and the community and it now covers 16 city blocks.

The Lifestyle Garden Centre

Nsika Architecture & Design

The goal was to double the overall size of the Lifestyle Centre’s Garden Centre without utilising any additional power. The team utilised solar shading devices, natural light and ventilation, solar powered heating, evaporative cooler! s, alternate chilled water production systems, rain water harvesting and grey water recycling. They describe it as a true journey of discovery into the world of sustainability.

The Lynedoch Community Centre

ARG Design

An educational facility that is an ecovillage was conceived for the relocation of the Spier Wine Estate farm workers school in the Western Cape. The team recycled materials and also a building- a school was reworked from an existing farm shed. The site has food gardens, recycles water, generates wind and solar energy and contains a constructed wetland, restoring indigenous landscape features.

New Residence, Bishop’s Court

Metropolis

In Bishops Court, Cape Town, on a site entirely surrounded by trees, this family residence combines the concerns of contemporary and of sustainable architecture into a building which is fir! mly modernist but is integrated with its natural surroundings. The for mal composition of the house is drawn from the image of a group of tree canopies and tree-houses floating over the ground plane, as an evocation of the forest on the site.

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